Is it Fate?

…no, but it could be f/8.

To rap up the jargon from two weeks ago, I spent the last week getting my sell better acquainted with manually adjusting the size of my Canon EOS Rebel XT’s aperture to capture different types of shots. I also took some time to become a bit familiar with using Adobe Lightroom. I have to admit that it wasn’t ever something I thought I would ever need to use, since I know how to operate Photoshop, but it definitely has helped with applying similar basic touch up edits to images I shot at the same shoot. I have really enjoyed it, and I hope you will enjoy seeing the final product photographs!

Narrow Aperture, Number One

To begin with, to the left I have my first example of utilizing a narrow aperture. I call it “A Warm Winter’s Day”. I took this image on January 24th, 2018, just a little before 4 in the afternoon. I went around BYU-Idaho campus taking some different shots, and got this one in the corner walkway between the Spori, Snow, and the Romney buildings. Here is some of the metadata from this image:

  • f/4
  • 1/1600
  • ISO 200
  • 18mm
  • Did not use flash
  • Camera was set up on a tripod

 

 

 

Narrow Aperture, Number Two

To the right, I call it “The Studio Artist’s Library”. I took this image on January 30th, 2018, about 1 in the afternoon. This is one of the walls in my studio room, where a good section of my personal library sits. Here is some of the metadata from this image:

  • f/22
  • 1.6
  • ISO 400
  • 18mm
  • Did not use flash
  • Camera was set up on a tripod

Wide Aperture, Number One

To the left I have my first example of utilizing a wide aperture. I call it “The Gateway to the Soul”. I took this image on January 20th, 2018, around 10:30 at night. My wife was kind enough to let me use her as a model in our home. I had turned off all of our living room lights, with the exception of a very low watt, warm incandescent light in the corner of the room. Utilizing some of the tools in Lightroom, I was able to liven up her eye a bit more. The exposure had left it almost to dark to tell the difference between iris and pupil. Here is some of the metadata from this image:

  • f/4.5
  • 1/4
  • ISO 400
  • 34.0 mm
  • Did not use flash
  • Camera was set up on a tripod

 

 

 

Wide Aperture, Number Two

And finally on the right, “The Night Watch”. I took this image on January 21st, 2018, at 10 in the evening. For “The Night Watch,” I was in the same location and used similar lighting conditions as when I shot “The Gateway into the Soul.” I took many different angled shots of this little stone gargoyle figurine, and I really liked how the wall carried the light of the lamp to just past where the gargoyle was sitting in this shot. It had almost made it a perfect silhouette as well, but I took this into Lightroom and raised the lights in the shadows a bit to bring out the details in his figure. Here is some of the metadata from this image:

  • f/4.5
  • 1/13
  • ISO 200
  • 35mm
  • Did not use flash
  • Camera was set up on a tripod

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